PROVIDING OPPORTUNITY FOR THE FUTURE LEADERS OF TOMORROW

PROVIDING OPPORTUNITY FOR THE FUTURE LEADERS OF TOMORROW

The Annual Venus Morris Griffin Scholarship Fund

The Venus Morris Griffin Scholarship Fund, Inc. a 501(c)(3) organization helps children who have an incarcerated parent with an opportunity towards attending college with a $10,000 Scholarship.

“I see every day through the eyes of my children how hard and stigmatizing it can be to have a parent who is incarcerated. I also know how empowering it feels to be educated. I am combining both of these feelings to help give these kids a shot at a better life. A life that does not have to be defined by the poor choices of their parents.

The Annual $10,000 scholarship is awarded to a student who currently has an incarcerated parent. It is not academic-based, because I know how hard it is to maintain good grades when your home life isn’t stable.”

– Venus Morris Griffin

According to the latest statistics provided by Rutgers University:

More than 2.7 million children in the U.S. have an incarcerated parent. That is 1 in 28 children.

Approximately 10 million children have experienced parental incarceration at some point in their lives.

Approximately half of children with incarcerated parents are under ten years old.

More than 2.7 million children in the U.S. have an incarcerated parent. That is 1 in 28 children.

Approximately 10 million children have experienced parental incarceration at some point in their lives.

Approximately half of children with incarcerated parents are under ten years old.

Recipients of this scholarship are chosen by Venus and her children. Scholarships are a valuable investment in our collective future and help develop promising future leaders. This scholarship is funded entirely by proceeds from Venus’ speaking engagements, and by donations from generous supporters and donors.

Terms and Conditions:

You must be a High School Senior in the United States

You must have a biological parent that is currently incarcerated

Students that are adopted and in foster care that meet all terms and conditions are encouraged to apply

Demonstrate acceptance into either an institution of higher learning or a trades program, award

One (1) entry letter allowed per person/email address/household explaining how having an incarcerated parent has impacted your life

Winner will be notified by e-mail and posted on venusmorrisgriffin.com and announced on November 30, 2021

For questions regarding the scholarship, please contact [email protected]
venusmorrisgriffin.com

Terms and Conditions:

You must be a High School Senior in the United States

You must have a biological parent that is currently incarcerated

Students that are adopted and in foster care that meet all terms and conditions are encouraged to apply

Demonstrate acceptance into either an institution of higher learning or a trades program, award

One (1) entry letter allowed per person/email address/household explaining how having an incarcerated parent has impacted your life

Winner will be notified by e-mail and posted on venusmorrisgriffin.com and announced on November 30, 2021

For questions regarding the scholarship, please contact [email protected]

Important Dates:

Application available: September 15, 2021
Application deadline: November 1, 2021
Scholarship announcement: November 30, 2021

To apply for the scholarship, please fill out the form below.

By clicking or tapping ‘Submit My Application’ you acknowledge and agree to our Privacy Policy and agree that all information submitted is valid.

2020
Venus Morris Griffin Scholarship Recipient
Kimberly Mazurek
Augusta, GA

KIMBERLY’S STORY

In the News

“There’s a way out, and education is it,” Augusta woman giving scholarship to child of incarcerated parent

You’ve probably seen the “V” billboard around town… V for Venus Morris Griffin, an Augusta real estate mogul. But the mother of seven’s journey to success began long before she became an award winning real estate agent.

“I had a very difficult childhood,” Venus said. “Watched my mother go in and out of rehabs and she went to jail a few times as well and my brother was sentenced to maximum security prison. So I had a very tough childhood.”

READ MORE